ADHD and business

3 Successful Tips for Entrepreneurs with ADHD

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Here is where you can find valuable tips, insights and stories to keep you motivated, inspired and prepared to take on any challenge!

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Right now, you may not see how any of your experiences will fit together. 

When you’re in a particular season, you don’t see how that will play in the bigger vision that you have in your life.

But it will. Everything is useful and has a purpose in leading you to the path you are now.

Things that you think are falling apart are falling into place.

ADHD does not and will not get in the way of achieving your goals.

Jamie King, the founder of The Slay Coach, teaches us how to launch into go-mode when Imposter Syndrome holds you back because of your ADHD. She tells us that desperation allows you to step on the gas and that all of your excuses can’t stand in the way of you making money and taking care of your family. 

We are people with different functioning brains. What works for them might not work for you, and that’s completely okay.

Stop swimming up someone else’s success stream.

Imposter Syndrome keeps you from understanding how to work with your ADHD. It causes you to think that you have to swim upstream in someone else’s creek.

It’s okay to struggle at planning and being organized. 

It’s okay to get easily overwhelmed when things look really complex. 

All you need is that willingness to find out how to make things simpler for yourself and who you can bring onboard to function as your strength when you are weak.

Stop trying to swim up in someone else’s success stream and crack open the walls to where the water was flowing in your own stream. There’s a way for people with ADHD to make it—start working with your genius, not against it.

Look for the most scalable thing you don’t hate.

The market is competitive. There is a demand for all sorts of things—but you can’t provide it all. 

You have to figure out the one thing you will focus on. 

What stream are you going to swim in and make yourself known for? 

Do your best and build a team that supports you. That way, you’ll be able to expand as you grow. You can branch off into new streams and widen your reach.

Creativity is a double-edged sword.

ADHD

People think that when you have ADHD, you have no problem with creativity. That’s not true. 

If you have ADHD, you tend to have too many creative ideas that it’s hard to find one that you can focus on and nurture.

This happens when you start something new, and there’s an overabundance of reward chemicals released in your brain. This hunger for rewards then pushes you to create more new things. 

You can get trapped in this cycle and never really achieve something that really leaves an impact on the world.

Creativity is a blessing, but it can keep us from sticking with anything long enough to leave a legacy behind. 

And to produce value for the world is a slow-growth thing. Don’t overcommit to a bunch of different things. Focus on one area and go deeper instead to see the results of your hard work before jumping on another thing.

Look for the most scalable thing that you don’t hate.

“What if what I’m passionate about isn’t what people are willing to spend their dollars on?”

Find the balance.

Look for where your current audience is having problems and create a solution they’re willing to spend their money on.

It can’t be something you totally hate because then you wouldn’t want to do it.

It has to be something you’re at least interested in.

Entrepreneurship, at its core, is an exchange of value. People give you money because they believe that what you have to offer is worth more than what they just paid you.

They have to feel like they’re getting a deal, that what you’re doing is valuable.

It’s not always about you.

As entrepreneurs, we are creatives. When we create a product, we often create from a self-centered, self-righteous place—” this is what I want to make, this is what I want to do.”

But, do people want that? It’s not always about you.

You get into business to be of service to others. Sometimes, we forget about that when we’re too spiritual, passionate, and multi-talented. 

“This is what I’m passionate about”—but if no one’s buying it, you are not of value, you are not of service to anyone.

This “starving artist” is a mentality, a paradigm that many people live in. You need to stop talking about broad, generic ways that are just super inspiring but which nobody really gets anything tangible from.

Go back to your “who,” “what,” and “how.”

“Who do I serve?”

“What problem do I solve for them?”

“How do I uniquely solve it?”

Do not confuse your audience. Nobody gets rich from confusion. Start focusing on clarity and solution-oriented practices.

Don’t stop being this way.

Your ADHD doesn’t need fixing. 

Embrace it. Build a system around it. 

It doesn’t have to slow you down. It’s possible to be successful while doing what you love. You just have to find your balance in a way that works for you in both your personal and professional life.

Follow Jamie King’s teachings as The Slay Coach and learn how you can turn your ADHD into a superpower that will help you thrive not just in your business but also your personal life. Stick around for another podcast and more Coachable episodes!

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